Brussels

Inside Art nouveau

Ernest Blérot

1870 - 1957

Sgraffiti decorations, upper section of the façade, Rue Vanderschrick 1 to 25 (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffiti decorations, upper section of the façade, Rue Vanderschrick 1 to 25 (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffiti decorations, upper section of the façade, Rue Vanderschrick 1 to 25 (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffiti decorations, upper section of the façade, Rue Vanderschrick 1 to 25 (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Ernest Blérot

Blérot is one of the most important Art Nouveau architects in Brussels, although he is considered to be part of the second generation of this movement. He built around fifty houses in just a few years. His Art Nouveau style is highly floral and pleasing to behold, and his creations were intended first and foremost for an enlightened bourgeoisie, who longed for Art Nouveau designs but lacked the financial resources of the country’s wealthiest families. He was also a prolific inventor (of locking systems, bicycles, etc.).

After making his fortune through his designs, he withdrew from professional life and dedicated himself to his Château d’Elzenwalle in the region of Ypres, which he inherited from his wife’s aristocratic family.

 

His works