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Inside Art nouveau

Private house owned by the architect Albert Roosenboom

Rue Faider 83, 1050 Ixelles, Belgium

Entrance hall, ground floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Entrance hall, ground floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Fireplace, lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Fireplace, lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Entrance hall, ground floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Entrance hall, ground floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Fireplace, lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Fireplace, lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Lounge overlooking the street, first floor (photo 2011) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Private house owned by the architect Albert Roosenboom

This remarkable house was designed by Albert Roosenboom, a student of Victor Horta, whose influence is evident here. The descendant of a family of painters originating from the Netherlands, he worked as a draughtsman in Horta’s studio, but only adhered to the Art Nouveau style for a short time.

EXTERIOR

Numerous elements were borrowed from Horta’s style, including the flared shape of the blue stone plinth course at the pavement level and the elegant, sinuous line of the boot scraper.

The distinctively-shaped bow window has a sculpted surround topped with a wrought iron balustrade displaying an unusual design.

On the top floor, a rectangular bay window is framed by an imposing sgraffito decoration, attributed to artist Henri Privat-Livemont. The centre of the composition features a female face; her eyes are closed and one of her index fingers is placed in front of her lips, as in the gesture for silence. Two children appear to be leaning on the gutters. A tangle of poppies frames the composition and links the figures.

INTERIORS

The rooms have a somewhat traditional layout but are nevertheless embellished with Art Nouveau-style decorative features.

One room overlooking the street includes a white stone fireplace decorated with a sgraffito motif, while the base of a wooden fireplace in the room at the centre of the house is covered with green ceramic tiles. The Art Nouveau-style floor mosaic also reflects the architect’s talent.

  • Status :
  • Listed (1981)

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