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Inside Art nouveau

House and studio of painter Emile Fabry

Rue du Collège St-Michel 6, 1150 Woluwe-Saint-Pierre, Belgium

Door, façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Door, façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Painter's former studio, first floor (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Painter's former studio, first floor (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Door, façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Door, façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Façade (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Painter's former studio, first floor (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Painter's former studio, first floor (undated photo) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

House and studio of painter Emile Fabry

House and studio for famous Symbolist painter Emile Fabry, who occasionally worked with Victor Horta. This house is characterised by a certain austerity that is rare in Art Nouveau, which we could almost describe as pre-Modernist.

FACADE

The façade of the house and studio sits on a plinth course of blue stone blocks, arranged in a rustic manner. The windows are arranged in a very functional, almost industrial manner, except for the cellar window, which is aligned with the one on the ground floor. The latter comprises a lovely geometric Art Nouveau sash window, inspired by a traditional Chinese motif, as well as understatedly decorated ironwork. The wooden door has a horseshoe-arched fanlight supported by fairly uncommon bas-relief statues depicting two kneeling women supporting the vault. At the top, in the façade and on the roof, there is a large glass roof spanning the entire width of the building to illuminate the studio. Just below, the door that surprisingly opens onto empty space was actually used to raise and lower the painter’s large-scale canvases.

INTERIOR

The painter’s studio was very functional and contained no decoration. However, the view and the light provided by the studio’s long window is sufficient to make it a very high-quality space. It is not therefore very difficult to imagine this space full of canvases and sculptures bathed in abundant natural light.

The residence was full of furniture and objects of all kinds.

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