Brussels

Inside Art nouveau

Private house owned by architect Gustave Strauven

Rue Luther 28, 1000 Brussels, Belgium

Detail of the ground floor, façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of the ground floor, façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Wallpaper (ca 1900-1905), ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Wallpaper (ca 1900-1905), ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Detail of the ground floor, façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of the ground floor, façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade before restoration (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Wallpaper (ca 1900-1905), ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Wallpaper (ca 1900-1905), ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Private house owned by architect Gustave Strauven

This house, an Art Nouveau masterpiece in Brussels, was the private residence of the Brussels-based architect Gustave Strauven.  With this building, he once more demonstrated his ingenuity in designing a house on a very narrow plot (only 3.75 metres wide).

FACADE

Strauven distracts from the narrowness of his house with an elegant decorative ensemble, including the use of polychrome and of varied materials; the yellow and blue glazed bricks on the façade meet the white stone and purple and grey slate elements framing the iron entrance gate, decorated with arabesques.

Behind this entrance gate, a small staircase ascends to the main floor, while another leads to the kitchen in the basement. The bow window on the first floor is a recent reconstruction, according to the archived plans left by the architect. Two pinnacles support the railing that surrounds the roof terrace.

INTERIOR

A narrow, pentagonal-shaped staircase, which receives daylight from a glass roof, ascends through the centre of the house and leads to a single room on each side, at the front and the rear of the building. This arrangement is repeated on every floor.

Its owner, an expert on Strauven’s work, has meticulously restored the building, the walls and woodwork, which have now regained  their original colours.

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