Brussels

Inside Art nouveau

Private house owned by Paul Cauchie

Rue des Francs 5, 1040 Etterbeek, Belgium

Dining room (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffito panel, detail of the façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffito panel, detail of the façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of a sgraffito decoration, lounge (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of a sgraffito decoration, lounge (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge furniture/Office fireplace (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge furniture/Office fireplace (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Small lounge table (ca 1905, photo 1971) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Small lounge table (ca 1905, photo 1971) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffito panel, detail of the façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sgraffito panel, detail of the façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of a sgraffito decoration, lounge (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Detail of a sgraffito decoration, lounge (photo 2015), photo Mathieu Litt ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge furniture/Office fireplace (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge furniture/Office fireplace (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Small lounge table (ca 1905, photo 1971) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Small lounge table (ca 1905, photo 1971) ©KIK-IRPA, Bruxelles. All rights reserved.

Private house owned by Paul Cauchie

This private residence, a unique feature in the urban landscape of Brussels, was designed by decorative architect Paul Cauchie and his wife in the first year of their marriage, as a demonstration of their talents. Paul and Lina, who were both artists and artisans, asserted their preferences and used the façade as an enormous advertising sign. It proclaims the motto of the property loud and clear: “By Us and for Us”. Come closer and note the two sgraffiti panels, which present a list of the couple’s skills.

Open : 1st WE of every month. Info : www.cauchie.be

EXTERIOR

This façade is original for Brussels. Its geometric character is a nod to the work of Scotland’s Charles Rennie Mackintosh, whom Cauchie admired greatly. Here, the fine, expensive materials generally used are replaced by a simple render that covers the façade like a canvas background. The blue stone is limited to the plinth course, while small wooden or cast iron columns support the Japanese-influenced front steps on the ground floor.

Take the time to admire all the details in the sgraffiti images, with their graceful female figures representing Architecture, the Fine Arts and the Applied Arts.

INTERIORS

Both the exterior and interior of the property reflect the couple’s highly personal artistic approach and the influence of the Scottish Glasgow School. This is displayed in the abundant use of the rose motif that Mackintosh used just as extensively.

With the exception of the shelves and cupboards in the dining room, the original furniture, which was also designed by Cauchie, has partially disappeared.

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