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Inside Art nouveau

Private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts

Rue de Liedekerke 112, Saint-Josse-ten-Noode, Belgium

Façade of the private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts (photo ca 1903), Architecture & Décoration, 1903, pl.39.

Façade of the private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts (photo ca 1903), Architecture & Décoration, 1903, pl.39.

Staircase from the entrance hall (photo 1996) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Staircase from the entrance hall (photo 1996) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade of the private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts (photo ca 1903), Architecture & Décoration, 1903, pl.39.

Façade of the private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts (photo ca 1903), Architecture & Décoration, 1903, pl.39.

Staircase from the entrance hall (photo 1996) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Staircase from the entrance hall (photo 1996) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge, ground floor (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Private house owned by the architect Léon Govaerts

In 1899, the architect Léon Govaerts purchased this house (which was originally Neoclassical in style) in order to recreate the façade in the Art Nouveau manner.

EXTERIOR

The house, which is built entirely of white bricks, is composed of five bays. The central bay is wider, in order to accommodate not just the entrance, but in particular a wide and predominantly metal bow window, decorated with orange-toned floral sgraffiti motifs. These can also be found between the ground floor and first floor windows. Those same warm tones are used in the decorative arches above the window lintels on the first floor. Note the delicate carved stonework on this façade. This may be found on the consoles of the oriel window, the uprights of the small windows below the cornice and also on the elements at each end of the cornice, where it is even more impressive.

INTERIORS

The interior is a reminder that the house pre-dates Art Nouveau. It consists of a Louis XVI lounge and rooms displaying the Eclectic style, embellished with moulded and gilded ceilings, and stucco and marble fireplaces. Only the staircase was significantly altered by Govaerts; it divides into two flights on the first floor landing, where there is a sumptuous stained glass window depicting a vase of flowers, primarily inspired by the Flemish neo-Renaissance style.

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