Brussels

Inside Art nouveau

Quaker House

Square Ambiorix 50, 1000 Brussels, Belgium

Façade (old photograph) ©urban.brusselsE. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©urban.brusselsE. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©AAM/Fondation CIVA Stichting, Brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©AAM/Fondation CIVA Stichting, Brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©urban.brusselsE. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©urban.brusselsE. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©AAM/Fondation CIVA Stichting, Brussels. All rights reserved.

Façade (old photograph) ©AAM/Fondation CIVA Stichting, Brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Dining room (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Lounge (photo 2011) ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Quaker House

This three-storey private mansion is now known as “Quaker House” and was built by the architect Georges Hobé. It was inspired by the style of English cottages and is an attempt to reproduce their characteristic simplicity, in which Hobé saw the modern style of the future: the bow window, the imposing chimney and the slate roof.

EXTERIOR

The only really striking feature of this façade is the large bow window topped with a slate roof, located at the corner of the building. It enlarges the interior space and in particular offers a wide panorama over the gardens of the squares. Below this bow window, you will see the creator’s signature and his title: “architect and decorator”.

INTERIORS

The architect paid particular attention to the woodwork and furniture, much of which is made of mahogany. The lounge is papered with magnificent golden Japanese wallpaper, while the walls of the other rooms are covered with fairly bold wallpaper imported from England and produced by major creators such as Charles Voysey.

The house currently accommodates the offices of the Quakers in Brussels. The interior decor has been perfectly preserved.

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