Brussels

Inside Art nouveau

The Stoclet Palace

Avenue de Tervueren 279,1150 Woluwe-Saint-Pierre, Belgium

Front façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Front façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Side view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Side view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Rear view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Rear view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sculptures by Frantz Metzner (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels.  All rights reserved.

Sculptures by Frantz Metzner (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Front façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Front façade (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Side view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Side view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Rear view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Rear view (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

Sculptures by Frantz Metzner (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels.  All rights reserved.

Sculptures by Frantz Metzner (photo ca 1990), photo Bastin-Evrard ©urban.brussels. All rights reserved.

The Stoclet Palace

This palace is one of the capital’s greatest attractions; it is considered to be one of the major Art Nouveau masterpieces, yet there is nothing Belgian about it. It was designed for the wealthy engineer and company director Adolphe Stoclet, who gave free rein and an unlimited budget to Vienna’s most renowned architect, Josef Hoffmann, one of the founders of the Vienna Secession.

This palace is almost remaining in its initial state, thanks to the good care of its owners, descendants of Adolphe Stoclet. Over the years, successive restoration projects have maintained the property in perfection condition. However, it is currently not possible to visit it.

The Stoclet Palace is inscribed on the World Heritage List of the UNESCO.

FACADE

The building’s impressive size warrants it being called a palace. Covered in Carrara marble and embellished with bronze strips, it is characterised by the abandonment of the curves so central to Belgian Art Nouveau. From the street, one can admire the different bronze statues by Frantz Metzner that decorate the turret and the entrance bay. The garden was also designed by the architect Josef Hoffmann, but it is located at the rear and unfortunately is not visible from the street.

INTERIOR

The interior reflects the concept of the total work of art advocated by the movement; everything, from the furniture to the kitchen utensils, was designed by the architect. Decorated and embellished with the rarest materials, it reflects both the wealth of the person who commissioned it and the new concept of simple sophistication idealised by Hoffmann. Gustav Klimt designed the mosaics in the dining room, which were executed using marble and semi-precious stones.

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